What is ‘DCBKK?’

Often referred as “DCBKK” to insiders, Dynamite Circle Bangkok is the annual flagship conference for location independent entrepreneurs held every October at the Conrad Hotel in Bangkok’s trendy and fashionable business district. Founded by Tropical MBA’s Dan Andrews and Ian Schoen, the creators of the popular podcast of the same name, Dynamite Circle is a $500 annual paid membership for location independent online entrepreneurs worldwide. Location independent means running an online business using the internet in such fields as e-commerce, SaaS (software as a service), SEO (search engine optimization), sales funnels, affiliate marketing, on-line courses, etc., where one makes a living primarily running a remote business which could include hiring an overseas team and not having to be tied to a specific location. The 5-day annual Bangkok conference attracts well over 300+ attendees engaging in workshops, speaker presentations, masterminds, and informal gatherings.

The main event.
The main event.

DCBKK is the largest Dynamite Circle conference; the other being Dynamite Circle Austin, Texas. Scattered throughout the year are smaller, informal gatherings called DCx, which include exotic locales as: Cape Town, Mexico City, Taipei, London, Budapest, Berlin, and Chiang Mai, to name a few. If that wasn’t enough, the third Thursdays of every month members are encouraged to join juntos, informal and intimate “meetups” at a local bar or restaurant, often organized by DC members residing in cities world-wide. If you are an entrepreneur, then joining Dynamite Circle definitely makes running your business less like operating in a vacuum—you now have supporters and expert advice on how to move forward.

The week in a nutshell

The first two days consists of workshop “meetups,” where many of the attendees—successful entreprenuers in their own right—give presentations on such diverse topics as, “How to increase online conversions,” “How I purchase 6 and 7-figure online businesses,” to “How I built a $100,000 a month internet side business.” Attending these were mind-numbing but refreshing; because the power point presentations were done in a laid-back and casual environment, I found it easy and more comfortable to engage the speaker with questions, not fearing from asking a question in front of a large crowd.

Friday is the all important and, some would say, the most crucial aspect of the whole week which is the mastermind. Numbering about 10 people and grouped by industry (mine was Amazon FBA), each participant was allotted 30 minutes to present his/her business and what questions, hurdles or pain-points your business is going through. Your mastermind is then responsible for providing advice, making suggestions, and giving you ideas on how to overcome these bottlenecks. In my experience, I found the mastermind helpful in making me think about alternate ways I could leverage my position, expertise, and skill set to increase business—invaluable insight!

Speakers on the main stage.
Speakers on the main stage.

Saturday and Sunday are the beginning of the formal workshops—6 talks in total on the big stage—where successful entrepreneurs discuss their entrepreneurial journey, what they learned, and what advice they would give. I found it very motivational and inspiring to learn from other people’s stories, giving me the confidence to continue my online businesses.

Of course, scattered throughout the week were formal and informal gatherings and official parties which included a rooftop bar, a pool-side party, and a closing party. One underlying aspect which distinguishes “DCers” from others is that they really know how to party and have a good time.

DCers on a coffee break
DCers on a coffee break

Key takeaways

One unique aspect I noticed right away is that DCers are a different breed, a positive, upbeat and very nurturing community where sharing information and helping others in their entrepreneurial journey is encouraged. Everywhere I turned, from workshops, to random meetings in the hallway, to the mastermind, everyone was spewing out advice or trying to put me in touch with someone who could help. I found it invigorating to be among such a supportive group where being open and vulnerable are the key to progress and success.

For me, depending of the topic and its relevance to my situation, I found some workshops and presentations to be more helpful than others. However, the very notion of being exposed to and to learning from the many different business models and speakers helped broaden my mind to location independent, on-line businesses opportunities. Gaining new insights, finding clarity, and forging new connections were the greatest takeaways for me.

Workshops about to begin
Workshops about to begin

Would I attend again?

Absolutely! Entrepreneurship is inherently lonely and by attending the conference I finally have found my community. Nearly every member I befriended I discovered something in common, whether it be having lived in the same city as Chiang Mai or Saigon; running an e-commerce or Amazon FBA business; or dealing with how to hire a team to scaling one’s business. These DCers are an energetic, open-minded, and supportive bunch and joining this global-minded, entrepreneurial group is one of the best decisions I have ever made!

Informal gatherings and networking.
Informal gatherings and networking.
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